Understanding Variance

13 May
understanding variance in poker

Variance can be cruel, or uplifting, negative or positive. One thing’s for sure - it’s here to stay. Even the best players in the world are subject to it. 

As Richard Swift put it in the awesome song of the same name, 

“But I wish sometimes that Lady Luck, she would find some time to spend with me”. 

We can relate, Rich!

 

What is Variance?

Variance is the term given to the uncertain short-term outcomes for which poker is well known, but it can of course apply to the swings in fortune you will see in any game where luck plays a role. 

The good thing about luck, of course, is that it is borrowed, not owned. 

In the long run everyone will roll an equal number of sixes, if we sit around rolling dice. The long run can be very long indeed (arguably millions of hands depending on the game format in question), but in the longest of long runs, luck will be distributed entirely evenly across all players, leaving only skill to determine who is ahead. 

This is the case with any game where the skill element is significant enough to play a major role, which there is no doubt that it is in poker, well established as a +EV skill game (positive equity value), meaning that it is beatable by dint of skill if you are sufficiently better than your opponents (and if you are not playing <10bbs deep and/or with insanely high rake).

 

Does Variance Matter?

If you have infinite (or just very large) bankroll and the patience of a Buddha, variance doesn’t really matter, as you can simply endure (or even enjoy!) the potentially seismic swings and treat it as the thrills of the rollercoaster. For all of us mere mortals, variance tends to matter, or at least feel that it matters, a good bit. 

It can be pretty rough to play through a big downswing, and it can also certainly cause you to second-guess your play, perhaps in spots where there is no need to do so. It’s certainly true that most experienced downswings tend to be a combination of variance and human errors, which will of course compound any impact which variance has on your play. Telling one from the other can be pretty tricky.

On the flip side, positive variance is also a thing, though fewer people tend to realise they are experiencing it. If you find yourself on the positive side of variance, especially near the start of your poker journey, you may simply feel that you are God’s gift to the game, long before your poker skills are really honed. This may give you a feeling of complacency which can limit your ability to grow as a player, or cause quite a shock when you hit your first downswing.

 

Measuring Variance

The tools are now available to measure variance really quite accurately, at least in terms of understanding how much of it exists in different types of poker games. This very fine tool from PokerDope is the best one online for doing exactly that, and you can program the settings of this calculator to measure how likely you are to have certain outcomes at a certain skill level in a certain MTT or SNG. There’s also a similar calculator for cash. 

To save you some trouble, we can provide some good rules of thumb for you right here in this article. If you’re playing cash poker and you are confident that you have a skill edge on the field, you likely need at least 30-40 buy-ins to avoid much risk of ruin (going busto) especially if you are multi-tabling or playing zoom format. For a SNG grind that goes up to at least 75-100 buy-ins, which is also a good minimum for micro stakes MTTs. If you move up to the midstakes or higher for MTTs, you really should be sitting down to play with at least a few hundred buy-ins available. For all formats this should be measured against your average buy-in.

 

Managing Variance

If you choose to control the amount of variance which you encounter, instead of simply “embracing the ride” as remarked above, we’d be in agreement that this is generally wise, and a good way of having a lower stress existence and enjoying the game to the max. 

Should you go this route, there are a number of ways in which you can control the amount of variance in your poker grind right from the off, and a lot of it comes down to game selection.

As noted above, choosing cash as your main grind is one way to go, as you certainly need the fewest buy-ins in your bankroll to weather the variance. This is simply due to the fact that chips are chips in cash poker, and you can sit and stand up as you please. MTT players on the other hand might run great at the start of a tourney and terrible at the end, or vice versa, and this is one reason there is a lot of variance in the MTT grind.

If you do play cash, you can further reduce the impact of variance by buying in with 100bbs rather than 200bbs, or by sitting out when you reach 150 or 200 big blinds, and sitting a new table with 100, especially if you have more skill edge with 100 big blind stacks. Bear in mind this will also cap your potential value gained in each pot. 

Another way to crush variance is simply to table select well and to sit spots where you have a large skill edge, as the impact of variance will be less the more profitable you are in a game. Long-handed tables also have less variance (and sometimes less value) than short-handed.

If we’re talking SNGs or MTTs, the smaller the field size, the less impact variance will tend to have. It is really not possible to measure your skill level according to your financial results in MTTs for example until you have a game sample of many thousands of games played, simply due to the size of the potential swings. So the gold standard for a low variance MTT grind is soft field, small field size, good structure. If you want to reduce it still further, knockouts and progressives reduce variance since you can win money before the bubble, though again your potential ROI (return on investment) will also be more capped in these games.

 

Making Peace with Variance

However much you opt to control the impact of variance on your play, it is important to realise that it’s a baked-in part of the game of poker, and that this is a good thing. Frankly, the fun players wouldn’t keep coming back to the game if they had no chance to win in the short-term. This is especially true of the MTT world, where beginners (with a bankroll!) can rub shoulders with the best in the world, something which you can say for very few sports or competitive endeavours on this Earth. 

Variance keeps the poker world turning, and without it we would literally just have a bunch of battle-hardened regulars out-grimming one another at the felt all day long and playing for razor thin edges. Every game would be the Hot $215 on Pokerstars, essentially. 

The good news is that it is possible for you to make peace with variance and not to sweat its impact on your game, past taking sensible steps to limit this as noted above. Beyond that it is important to find equanimity, and to accept that we are going to frequently face outcomes we don’t want in a poker game, there is literally no way to avoid that. Don’t go folding those Jacks just because you might have tough spots with them, it’s all part of the ride. 

Some simple steps to achieving a zero-tilt mentality with regard to variance are to remind yourself, if you’re an MTT player, that you will frequently finish 11th, or 9th, or 24th when you make that deep run. If you’re a cash player, you’ll have downswing days, don’t sweat it and don’t chase those losses. Suffering over variance has compounded many a poker player’s losses as they go on tilt after a casual player hits a 2-outer against them in a 400bb pot and they get steamed and start to punt, throwing bad money after good (to reverse the old saying). 

If you’d like to read more PokerDeals guidance on mindset, check out our PokerDeals Mindset 101 post here.

Breathe, remember it’s better than working down the mines, and remember how lucky we are able to sit and play this beautiful game. In the long run you’ll deal out exactly as many bad beats as you’ll receive. You can’t avoid that, but you can certainly avoid stressing out over it. Enjoy the game. If it’s no longer fun, it’s time to hit the beach, the mountain trails, or just sit down with a friend or lover and get some real life EV time.

 

Related Strategies

poker tells - the eyes

Poker Tells Part Two - The Eyes

There's a lot you can tell about someone by their eyes. Often it only takes one look into someone's eyes to tell you what kind of person they are; such is their transparency - there's a reason why they're called the window to the soul . That's useful to us as poker players, because if we can see into someone's soul, then surely we can use that information to find out what they have. While it's not as simple as that, people give away a lot with their eyes, even if they don't realise they're doing it. In this piece, we'll be looking at the most common poker tells that you can spot by looking at your opponent's eyes and how to counter them. Intense Eye Contact In the first part of our poker tells series , we covered that if a player is trying to look strong, it often means they're weak, and if they're trying to look weak, it often means they're strong. Making intense eye contact with your opponent after betting is one of the biggest signallers of strength you can come across . It's saying, "You can look at me all you want. I'm confident in my bet. I'm not scared of you.” But is that really how they feel? Well, that depends. To know whether this is a "show” of strength or actual strength, you need to consider your opponent's past behaviours . Do they often stare at their opponents after making a bet? When they do, have they shown down good hands or bluffs? All of this is key information, as you're trying to find a pattern in your opponent's play. Some people are more relaxed when they have a strong hand and are more likely to make eye contact, whereas others make intense eye contact to psych out their opponent. You can often tell which is which based on the other body language they give off. The more tense and fixated their eye contact, the more likely it is that it's forced, and the more likely it is that they're weak. How Do I Counter It? If you think that someone is deliberately making eye contact in an attempt to look strong, then you can assume that their range is likely weaker than average. You can counter this by calling a slightly wider range and being more aggressive against their bets. The more certain you are in your read, the wider you can make your calling range and the more aggressively you can play back at them. Quickly Looking Away After Eye Contact You may think that if intense eye contact is a deliberate attempt to look strong, then a failure to hold eye contact must be the opposite, right? Well, you're partly right, but it's not quite so simple. It's a lot harder to fake looking away right as someone sees you than it is to fake strength by holding eye contact. If you've ever tried to surreptitiously look at someone, only for them to notice you, you'll know the rush of adrenaline that you get as you snap your head back in the opposite direction. This means that it's more likely to be an actual display of weakness , as they want to look over and gauge what your decision will be, but they don't want to let you get a good look at them. If you spot someone doing this at the table after they've made a bet, it's a clear sign that they're uncomfortable with the hand , which likely means they have a weaker range. How Do I Counter It? As this isn't a feigned display of weakness, we can assume that anyone who has done this at the table likely has a weaker-than-average range. To counter it, we can widen our calling range and play more aggressively with our drawing hands, as we believe they're more likely to fold. Just be sure that they actually do look weak before widening your calling range too much. Remember, only make small adjustments until you have confirmed the reliability of the tell. Staring at the Board, Then Quickly Looking Away You have to be paying close attention to your opponent to spot this tell, but it's a good one if you can notice it. Most players tend to stare at the board as the next card is about to be dealt. It's understandable, as they want to get the information as soon as possible so they can start formulating their plans for the next betting street. However, when they do that, they may unwittingly give off a reaction to the card(s) that betrays their true feelings. One of the biggest reactions someone can give is to instantly look away from the board as soon as a card is dealt . Looking away from the hand is supposed to signal that they're not interested in what's going on, but in this case, it means the opposite. They've seen the card they need to make their hand, so they quickly look away to avoid fixating on it, but in doing so, they let us know that they've liked what they've seen. For casual players, an even stronger tell may be when your opponent acts so disinterested in the board after seeing the community cards that they look around the room, stretch back in their seats, start chatting to other players, or display any form of total nonchalance to the cards. Be very cautious of these fake displays of indifference . Knowing exactly how quickly someone needs to react to a card is an inexact science, which is why it's important to constantly watch your opponents during hands instead of scrolling through Twitter or Tik Tok. There's no exact number of milliseconds that count as looking away instantly, but if you play with someone long enough, you can tell when they look away quicker than usual. How Do I Counter It? Most players will look down at the flop when it's dealt. However, you won't get a read on your opponent from looking down at the cards . Be sure to watch your opponents closely when cards are dealt to pick up on whether they instantly look away, or keep their eyes on the community cards. This will help inform your decision. How you counter this tell is dependent entirely on the card that comes and the strength of your hand. If your opponent has improved to a better hand than yours, you'll want to play as cautiously as possible, but if they've improved to a hand that's worse than yours, you can play aggressively to try and get maximum value. Cards that complete straight draws and flush draws are obvious cards to look out for, as are high cards on low boards, as it may mean that your opponent has made top pair. The same goes for lower cards on mid-high boards, as they could have made a set with a small pair. Our advice is always to act cautiously until you're sure this is a solid read , so only make small adjustments either way, depending on the strength of your hand relative to your opponent's new perceived range. Pupil Dilation This one is close to impossible if your opponent is wearing sunglasses and will take a lot of practice even if they aren't, but it's one of the most reliable tells you'll come across. It's based on the fact that people's pupils dilate when they see something they like . It happens when you've been given a slice of your favourite chocolate cake, when you see a friend or a loved one, or when you make your flush on the river. It's one of the many reasons why I advocate not staring at the board when the cards are being dealt; you won't be able to control these reactions when you do, which gives your opponents the chance to spot a tell. However, luckily for us, lots of people decide that staring at the card that's about to come is a good idea, which gives us a chance to spot it instead. This tell is impossible to fake , so you won't have to worry about someone double bluffing you - if their pupils dilate, they're very happy with the card that's just come. How Do I Counter It? If you manage to spot this tell in the wild, it's almost certain that your opponent has a super strong hand. Unless you have the nuts or close to it, you should play very cautiously and pray for a cheap showdown. Chip Staring Another reaction amateur players often make when seeing a card they like is to stare directly at their chips to figure out how much they want to bet. It's a real sign of strength, as it shows that their first thought after seeing the next card is, "How much more money can I get into the pot?” When players bluff, they often take time to consider things like whether or not they have the right hand to bluff with, whether it's a good spot to bluff, and whether their opponent will fold. If they have a value hand, there's less to consider; as you know you want to bet, the question is only "How much?” This tell can be faked by experienced players, so it's best to only use it against amateurs who likely won't realise what they're doing. Again, be sure to watch your opponents when they first look at their cards. Less experienced players who know this tell are still more than likely to glance down at their chips before their brain has told them not to. This act of strength is a little harder to fake. How Do I Counter It? If you've spotted an amateur player with this tell, the best course of action is to proceed cautiously. Fold more often against their bets, and play more passively against their checks to try and get a cheap showdown. As this tell is well known and can easily be faked, you should be far less inclined to alter your strategy if you see a strong player perform this tell. Summary There's a reason why a lot of professionals tend to wear sunglasses at the table; it's because you pick up a lot of tells from your opponents if you know where to look. It's hard to fake eye reactions , which makes them one of the most reliable forms of tells you can find. Once you train yourself to look for these subtle tells and cross-reference them against your opponent's previous behaviour, you'll find yourself making a lot more correct decisions at the table. Join us in Part Three of this Poker Tells series, where we'll be looking at the nose and mouth. Make sure you join our by join our PokerDeals Facebook group or follow us on Instagram to be notified of the next article in the series. *Images courtesy of PokerGo

25 Jan
Poker tells - the brain

Poker Tells Part One - The Brain

I know what you're thinking: "You can't see someone's brain; how can you pick up poker tells from that?” And you're right; you can't see someone's brain, but what you can do is understand the psychology of your opponents . Once you know why your opponent is acting in a certain way, it becomes much easier to exploit them. In part one of our series on poker tells , we're starting right at the top, the control centre of everything you do - the brain. We'll be looking at the most common psychological poker tells players give away at the table and how you can exploit them. Strong When Weak, Weak When Strong One of the most common psychological tells you'll come across in poker is a pretty straightforward one: When a player is acting strong, they're weak, and when they act weak, they're strong. It's basic reverse psychology, designed to trick you into making the wrong move. While it may be simple, it's surprisingly effective. Humans are social creatures, and one of our great strengths is the ability to pick up on nonverbal cues to interpret how someone is feeling . If you look at someone who doesn't look confident, your instinct is to take that at face value, so you assume they have a weak hand. If you don't question your instincts, you'll end up making the wrong decision. But how do you know when someone is being genuine or not? After all, I've just explained that your instinct will be to trust everyone at face value, so how do you identify the people who are being deceptive? While there may be some people at the table who look dodgy enough that your instinct isn't to trust them, that's not going to be the case for everyone. The best way to identify the people who are being deceitful is to watch them while they're playing and look at the results at showdown. How does their body language match the hands they're showing down? Do they align or not? Only through carefully studying your opponent can you truly identify the players with this psychological tell . Be Wary Of False Tells If you're up against other thinking players at the table, there's a chance that they'll give off false tells to try and "level” you into making the wrong decision. The "strong is weak, weak is strong” tell is one of the most common ones for people to fake - mainly because it's the easiest to do! This is why you need to pay close attention to the hands your opponents are showing down . It's easy to look at a player making a big show of aggression and think, "Wow, look at that; he's trying so hard to look strong; he must be weak!” whereas in reality, they're trying to trick you into calling. While there's no foolproof way of determining when someone is faking a tell or not, the best chance you have is to think about the kind of player they are . The better a player is, the more likely they will fake a tell. This is because good players will do their best to eliminate actual tells from their game but recognise that other players will look for them, so they deliberately mislead you with false tells. How Do I Counter It? Once you've found one of these players at the table, you need to act on it! There's no point in identifying tells if you're not going to adjust your game once you've found one . Luckily, this one is very easy to counter, but just in case you're new to this, I'll spell it out for you. If they're acting weak, it means they're strong, so when they act weak, only continue with your strongest hands. If they're acting strong, it means they're weak, so when they act strong, call down lighter or play back at them more aggressively. It's as simple as that! As long as you have a solid read that your opponent is giving off this tell, you'll be able to exploit it by doing the opposite of what they want you to do. Acting Fast Another common tell at the poker table is acting fast. Just to be clear, by acting fast, I don't mean that they take 10 seconds to make a decision; I'm talking snap decisions - often less than a second or two. Many players struggle to understand what it means when a player acts fast, so let's break it down. So what does it mean when a player is acting fast? Well, if they're able to make their decision almost instantly, it tells us that they don't have to think about it. If they can act in a split second, their decision must be so obvious that they don't have to consider it at all . Sometimes in poker, you have really obvious decisions. For example, if you have the nuts on the river with a pot-sized bet left behind, you know you're going to go all in - you don't have to think about it. Almost all of the time, these obvious decisions are when we have our strongest hands . Some players will make these decisions instantly; why bother waiting around, right? But most players will at least pause for a few seconds to make it look like they have a decision before making the obvious play. So, if someone is acting instantly, they either have an obvious decision, or they're trying to make it look like they have an obvious decision and, by extension, a very strong hand. Just like before, the best way to figure out which is more likely is by studying how your opponents play and viewing their hands at showdown. If your opponent always takes a few seconds before betting with strong hands, and suddenly they're snap-jamming over your bet, it's likely that they're trying to make themselves look strong. Another way you can figure out how strong they are is by looking at the board texture . Often, the dryer the board texture, the easier your decisions are, as there are fewer straight and flush draws to worry about. Conversely, if a board is sopping wet with straight and flush draws all over the place, you often have to take more time to figure out how you want to play it, even with your strong hands. Therefore, someone acting instantly on a wet board is more than likely making a show of strength , as if they had a value hand, they'd want to consider their options on such a draw-heavy board. How Do I Counter It? If you think you've identified an opponent with this tell, how do you adjust to it? Well, we've discussed that someone acting instantly in an unlikely situation means they're more likely to be bluffing. That means the best way to adjust to this tell is to call them down wider. Exactly how wide you call them down will depend on your level of confidence in the tell. If you only have a suspicion that your opponent has this tell, only widen your calling range by a couple of percentage points until you get a solid idea of how they're playing. One of the ways tells become unprofitable is by over-adjusting to them once you think you've found one - keep it conservative until you have a rock-solid read . Acting Slow On the other side of the coin, we have players who act excessively slowly when making a decision. We know there are some players who seem to take an age over every decision, but those aren't the ones we're focusing on here. We're talking about the players who play normally but suddenly decide to spend a long time on one decision. While you may think that it's just the opposite of acting fast, and therefore we just make the opposite adjustment, it's a little more nuanced than that. Again, let's start by looking at what it means if someone is taking a long time to make a decision. If they take a long time to act, the implication is that they have a very tough decision that needs to be thought through . More often than not, this means that a player either has a thin value hand or a bluff. However, as we mentioned earlier, a player may be deliberately taking a long time to give the illusion of a difficult decision where none exists. How do you determine the difference between a legitimate tank and a fake one? The key difference is the amount of time someone takes. If they're actually thinking through a decision, they'll take a lot longer to do so, as they're not even noticing how long they're taking. If you've ever tried to "fake tank” when you know exactly what you're going to do, thirty seconds feels like an hour. You can't wait to make the action you want, so it's hard to wait the same amount of time you do when making a legitimate decision. While there's no specific amount of time that has to occur for someone to be legitimately thinking, a good rule of thumb is the longer someone takes to decide, the more likely it is that their hand is weak. How Do I Counter It? As this tell is a little harder to identify, it's best not to go overboard when making your adjustments. If you think someone is likely to be weak based on the time it takes them to make their decision, you can adjust by calling wider or playing back at them more aggressively. However, I'd only recommend making slight adjustments until you're confident in your read. Attentiveness At The Table Being consistently attentive at the table is very hard to do when playing live poker. The pace of the game is slow, you have to fold most of your hands, and it's far too easy to get distracted by the goings on in the casino around you. This is something that affects every player at the table, and it's something you can exploit if you look closely enough. Preflop You'll notice a marked difference in the posture and attentiveness of players at the table when they pick up a good hand they want to play. They'll transform from slouching blobs at the table to perfectly postured players, and you'll see their eyes light up as they realise they finally have a good hand to play. You can often see them shuffling around in their seat, itching for it to be their turn to act. All of this adds up to a strong hand they can't wait to play. If you see someone acting like this at the table, know that it's very likely they have a great starting hand. Postflop Once the hand is in full flow, there are still ways you can use the attentiveness of a player to your advantage. One of the major things to look for is your opponent's reaction to the flop, turn, or river . Most players can't help but watch the flop as it comes out, eager to see whether or not they've made their hand. Instead of following along, you should watch your opponents as the flop is being dealt and look for the small reactions they make . Most recreational players can't help but crack a little smile when they've made their hand or shake their head slightly if they've missed the board completely. These tells are a lot harder to fake, as many players don't even know they're being watched when it happens. Better players are more experienced at hiding these tells, but many players will give something away if you watch closely enough. Another action to look out for during a hand is if a player looks completely disinterested in what's going on at the table. They're watching people play roulette or watching the TV - basically doing anything but looking at what's happening on the felt. While this may seem like someone a tell of weakness, it all depends on their posture. Someone who is slouching in their seat and isn't interested in what's going on likely has a weak hand. They're not in a position where they're ready to make an action other than fold when it comes around to them. However, if someone is sitting upright in their seat, they're showing that they are interested. Remember our preflop tell? Players will give away their general interest through their body language. If someone is trying to look disinterested in the hand but has positive body language, they likely have a strong hand. How Do I Counter It? As there are a couple of parts to this section, we'll break them down individually. Preflop - If your opponent suddenly takes a keen interest in the game after being distracted, they likely have a strong hand. Counter this by playing tighter and only playing with the strongest hands in your range. Postflop Positive - If your opponent reacts positively to the flop, turn, or river being dealt, the card has likely improved their hand. Counter this by playing tighter against their bets and by not falling into their trap if they check. Postflop Negative - If your opponent reacts negatively to the flop, turn, or river being dealt, the card has likely not helped their hand. Exploit this by being more aggressive with your bluffs and by trapping with your strong hands. Postflop Disinterest - If your opponent looks disinterested in the hand, they're likely trying to feign a weak hand. Counter this by playing tighter against their bets and by playing passively when they check. Summary Understanding the meaning behind certain actions at the table is vitally important to interpreting poker tells. While we've covered the tells most affected by psychology in this article, each tell in the series is going to be somewhat affected by the concepts we've covered today. Emotions play a key role in how we act at the table, and they're not always able to be controlled. Knowing that the actions of your opponents are affected by these emotions makes them easier to understand and, therefore, easier to exploit at the tables. Join us in Part Two of this Poker Tells series, where we'll be looking at the window of the soul - the eyes . Make sure you join our by join our PokerDeals Facebook group or follow us on Instagram to be notified of the next article in the series.

16 Jan
Poker Tells Introduction

Poker Tells - A Look Into The Minds Of Your Opponents

Have you ever sat across from your opponent at the poker table and thought to yourself, "Man, this decision would be so much easier if I knew what they were thinking!” While it seems like an obvious comment to make, so much of the difficulty around playing poker is that you never truly know what your opponent is thinking ; you can make what you think is the right move, only to find out they were doing the opposite of what you thought! However, by learning how to spot and understand poker tells, you can get a small window into the minds of your opponents, making it easier to know what to do. If you've ever wanted to gain insight into how strong or weak your opponent is at the table , this is the series for you. Over the coming weeks, we'll look closely at all the tells your opponents could be giving off at the table, starting from their head and moving down to their feet. We'll talk about what to look for, how to understand it, and how you should adjust your game based on what you've seen. What Are Poker Tells? For the uninitiated, poker tells are subtle movements or actions players make that give away the strength of their hand . For example, a player's neck may start to pulse if they're bluffing, or their hands may start to shake if they have a big hand. These movements are involuntary, and many players don't even realise they're making them! Aside from the unintentional visual tells a player can make, there can also be various verbal tells that will give you the added information you might need to make the right call. If you've ever seen a poker movie, you'll have seen an example of a poker tell used by the hero to make an outstanding play, like Mike McDermott folding top two pair against Teddy KGB in Rounders. While tells like these are often made more obvious in TV and movies, the underlying concept is still the same. Are Poker Tells Real? Some players refuse to take into account poker tells when making their decisions, dismissing them as psychological mumbo-jumbo, but they are, in fact, a real thing! Humans are emotional beings , and many of us find it hard to control those emotions on a day-to-day basis, let alone when we're playing a card game for significant amounts of money. The key is learning to identify these tells in your opponent, figure out what they mean, and use them to your advantage. Players often assume that if a tell means one thing for one person, then the same thing automatically applies to everyone else - this is not the case! A tell, at its core, is a physical reaction to stress. This could be the stress of bluffing with a weak hand or the stress of wanting to get paid with a strong hand . Different people experience these emotions at different levels, with some being more affected by bluffing than value betting and vice versa. It's your job to use your poker experience to learn which one applies to your opponent and use it against them. What Will This Series Cover? In this series of articles, we'll take an in-depth look at every kind of poker tell imaginable , starting from the head and working our way down the body. We'll cover how to spot these tells while sitting at the table, how to interpret these tells based on other information you can gather at the table, and what you should do when you've picked up a solid tell on your opponents. By the end of the series, you'll have a comprehensive bible on poker tells that you can reference at your leisure. However, the best way to experience this content is to catch each one as it's released, as that means you can immediately start using the information to exploit your opponents. Stay tuned for our first article on poker tells, where we'll be covering the head, by joining our PokerDeals Facebook group or following us on Instagram .

6 Jan

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